The train cemetery in Uyuni, Bolivia
The train cemetery in Uyuni, Bolivia

The train cemetery in Uyuni, Bolivia

The train cemetery in Uyuni, Bolivia

Asi es la vida

Uyuni, Bolivia

It is at Uyuni, a small town of just over 10,000 inhabitants located more than 3,670 meters above sea level that can be found one of the most famous train cemetery. Well, we must also say that the world's largest salty desert is located in Uyuni : the Salar of Uyuni. But hey, that's another story.

This unusual cemetery has its origins in the railway history of the country and this city which was once the largest crossroads of Bolivia railway. With its 10 million inhabitants, Bolivia is landlocked by Peru and Argentina to the east, north Brazil and Paraguay and Argentina to the south.

Thus, the carcasses of the thirty locomotives and wagons attracts its share of tourists. While some balk against the look of semi-dump of the place, others like to walk down this post-apocalyptic western atmosphere where rust does its work on these locomotives of the past century.

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