Monkeys castle
The abandoned Monkeys castle

The abandoned Monkeys castle

The abandoned Monkeys castle

Vestige of the seventeenth century

Haute-Normandie, France

Listed historical monument, the Monkeys castle is a beautiful mansion built in the seventeenth century. Its name comes from the frescoes on the walls that depict monkeys. It is also known as the Madness Castle and  the Bettor Castle. Located in a small town of less than 400 people, we will not mention his real name as well as its geographical location to protect it against vandals who have repeatedly visited the castle.

Abandoned since 2012, the Monkeys castle quickly became famous on the internet. Its architecture and staircase of great beauty have made it a popular place for urbexers.

Lately, it has even fallen prey to taggers who came inside to paint their mark. Following an outcry against this act filmed and broadcast on the Internet, a urberxer called Taz Dark Photography (www.facebook.com/DarkTazPhotography) came inside with a gallon of paint to remove this affront to this historic building. Saluted by urbex community, of course.

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