The Brock tunnel
The Brock tunnel, relic of the past

The Brock tunnel, relic of the past

The Brock tunnel, relic of the past

Relic of the Battle of Queestown

Montréal (Quebec), Canada

Named after General Isaac Brock died at the Battle of Queestown October 13, 1812 (conflict between Canada and the United States, where the British army crushed the Americans), the tunnel was built between 1889 and 1895. Known as the tunnel Beaudry, because it was an extension of the street of the same name, it was 208 meters long, only 60 less than the Titanic. Its construction cost $ 163,750 and it was dug with picks and shovels from both ends. At the meeting point of the two teams, it was installed a commemorative plaque to mark the event.

Despite its closure in the 1970s, the site was used as filming locations for several films, including Jesus of Montreal directed by Denis Arcand and The Last Tunnel directed by Érik Canuel.

Today, half of the tunnel has been blocked because its output has been buried. A huge parking lot owned by the Molson Brewery, now occupies the space. Its northern entry has been fenced, preventing anyone wanting to enter. However, traces of occupations show that the place is busy during the summer. Beer bottles litter the ground here and there and we found sleeping bags and personal effects.

During our visit, some gigantic stalactites was offering a surreal spectacle for that spring day.

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